Wildland Firefighter Resume Sample

Wildland Firefighters fight and prevent forest fires. They put out small outbreaks before they can become large, dangerous fires; they also assess fire risk levels in an area, locate possible fire outbreaks or dangers, and map out strategies for removing dangerous vegetation. The top skills for this position are communication skills, physical strength, endurance, drive, self-confidence, and leadership. A high school diploma or equivalent is required for this position, as well as formal firefighting training. A background in forestry is helpful, but not required.

The Best Wildland Firefighter Resume Samples

These are some examples of accomplishments we have handpicked from real Wildland Firefighter resumes for your reference.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Engine crew; suppress wildfires primarily using heavy-duty vehicles with water/foam delivery systems.
  • Duties include operating the engines that pump and distribute water or foam, driving the fire engines, and communicating to facilitate suppression operations.
  • Engage in other fire suppression work, including fire line construction, preparing fire breaks, burning out control lines, mopping up, felling small trees, and cutting brush using a chainsaw.
  • Physical training and work projects like basic facilities maintenance, trail construction, thinning, and preparation of prescribed fire units.
  • Trained with senior firefighters on wildland fire techniques, protection, and swift water rescue techniques.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Serve as a wildland firefighter and/or emergency responder on a statewide basis.
  • Duties include operation of heavy firefighting equipment, use of hand firefighting tools, and performing ground reconnaissance on wildfires.
  • Willingness to travel for long periods of time.
  • Was the only wildland firefighter in training at the time to be certified as a wildland firefighter twice over (firefighter and instructor).
  • Promoted by the Statewildfire Chief to be an active member of various departments including public education, budgeting, and grants management.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Used complex and heavy equipment and maneuvers to control, contain, and extinguish forest fires.
  • Help with project work around the forest.
  • Must be physically ready for carrying heavy tools and equipment sometimes for miles at a time.
  • Demonstrated excellent teamwork with younger members of a department undertaking complex operation plans.
  • Taught effective high-risk rescue techniques for downed pilots using airbags during a simulated airport emergency response exercise.

Wildland Firefighter

  • I was a member of a Type II IA Handcrew which was staged for multiple initial attacks.
  • On the initial attack, I constructed a handline and utilized a hose lay for mopping up and securing hot spots to prevent future fire outbreaks.
  • I performed multiple project work where I was utilized as a swamper to build slash piles for fuel reduction projects.
  • Responded to and controlled two wildfires in a two-week period; was instrumental in fire containment efforts, demonstrating initiative on the British Columbia side of the border.
  • Rescued an injured firefighter; administered emergency first aid while awaiting medical personnel.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Worked as a wildland firefighter II on several prescribed burns.
  • Worked to prepare the site for burning, cutting, moving, and piling brush.
  • Cutline participated in safety exercises, weather observations, and other logistics, and maintained and sharpened fire tools and equipment.
  • Participated in firing operations, direct and indirect attacks, holding hotline, patrolling, mop-up, and rehabilitation.
  • Intervened when three campers became lost while hiking near Big Lake, British Columbia, Canada; successfully guided them back to their base camp.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Suppressed and extinguished wildland fires utilizing a type 6 engine, hand tools, and chainsaws to include the Pulaski, McLeod, rake, combi tool, hose lays, and portable pumps.
  • Utilized radios to distribute and receive information within the crew.
  • Worked in adverse and rugged conditions carrying approximately 45 pounds of equipment while working.
  • Pioneered a new method of blaze detection by utilizing infrared light technology to identify fire intensity across forest land.
  • Preserved natural state while battling wildfires and wildland fires through the United States during the summer and winter seasons.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Being away from home for 14 days straight sleeping in tents at fire camps around the location of the fire.
  • Hiking around rough and steep terrain with a fire pack weighing up to 45 plus pounds.
  • Mop up, putting out hot spots that could reignite the fire.
  • Saved lives by implementing positive communication with residents who refused to evacuate their homes during the fire’s approach.
  • Spearheaded operation to extinguish a fire that threatened homes and businesses in a small town; led safety measures that were instrumental in saving nearby homes from burning.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Squad Boss that led crew members in work assignments, fire assignments, project work, etc.
  • Radio communications with crew bosses, dispatch, captains, and other squad bosses while on assignments.
  • Performed manual and semi-skilled labor in a safe manner as a member of a fire hand crew assigned to suppress the full range of difficulty and complexity of fires.
  • Cleaned, reconditioned, and stored specialized fire tools and equipment.
  • Educated citizens on fire prevention; gave public presentations, persuasive talks, interviews with media, etc. after helping to extinguish fires.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Assumed a wide range of responsibilities and worked extended hours to meet the needs of the team.
  • Safely operated equipment while wearing proper protective equipment under extremely physically challenging conditions.
  • Performed daily routine maintenance of fire engine.
  • Cleaned up hazardous forest environments; cleaned up logging sites for reforestation.
  • Earned award for superior performance in situational awareness, communication, and leadership.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Reduced and controlled fuel and fire hazards by 50 percent in trail maintenance and riparian zone.
  • Provided first aid prevention for bee and wasp stings, snake bites, poisonous plants, and minor abrasions.
  • Operated in usage and maintenance with different types of equipment including Pulaski, McLeod, and Sledge.
  • Entrusted with being the safe designated driver to and from work areas such as state parks, city agencies, and restoration.
  • Demonstrated skills necessary to effectively plan and manage fire suppression actions.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Extinguished flames and embers to suppress fires, using shovels, clouds, pulaski’s, and chain saws.
  • Rescued fire victims and administered emergency medical aid.
  • Tested and maintained tools, equipment, and fire shelters, to ensure readiness for fire suppression activities.
  • Maintained contact with fire dispatchers at all times to notify them of the need for additional firefighters and supplies, and to detail any difficulties encountered.
  • Contributed to community development through the coordinated implementation of multiple programs designed to facilitate constructive relationships between first responders and citizens.

Wildland Firefighter

  • Performed multiple aspects of wildland fire suppression, including cutting, prepping, holding, monitoring, and mop-up of the fire line.
  • Performed engine duties, including starting pump, pump-priming, and adjustment of engine speed and pump valves, laying hose for initial attack incidents as well as indirect attack incidents, and using the correct nozzle and nozzle attachments to ensure effective water usage.
  • Fully qualified chainsaw operator, with the ability to perform in-the-field repairs, sharpening, and other necessary patience as needed.
  • Proficiently use Bendix King and Midland Radio, with full capability to program and clone radios as needed.
  • Received recognition from department personnel for outstanding performance in State Firefighter-Evaluation Program (FFEP).

How to Become a Successful Wildland Firefighter?

The education required to become a firefighter is a little different from most jobs due to the nature of the position. You will need a high school diploma or a GED as well as a driver’s license to begin, and then you can enroll in a training program to become an EMT as well as a firefighter.

Depending on where you live, forest fires may be seasonal, meaning you will be very busy for part of the year and not for the rest. The busy season is typical during the hot and dry summer, and this is also when you will be facing the largest and most dangerous fires of the year.

Safety is critical for such a dangerous job, so you should always follow the rules for the sake of yourself as well as everyone you work with. Their lives and yours depend on good communication and teamwork, so always make sure you are listening and letting others know if you need assistance.

Saving lives will also require some emergency medical training, which you will always want to be sharp on. You never know when you may be called to fight a fire, and woodland fires are often out in the forest where you will be away from home and working long hours, so always be ready.

Wrap Up

In forests across all parts of the world, the dry season comes with the terrible risk of fires, either from human negligence or natural effects. People rely on brave firefighters to protect them and their homes from the fires that are an almost yearly occurrence in many parts of the world, as without them they could lose everything.

Hope these samples gave you an idea of what your resume should look like and some tips on how to make sure that your resume stands out from the rest.

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